Monday, March 18, 2013

The Captain

How does the speaker feel about the captain?  Use evidence from the poem to support your answer.

41 comments:

  1. The speaker feels very strongly about the captain. At one point he refers to him as "father". He is very distraught that his captain died, and wills him to get up and be okay, to see the things being offered to him and hear the people on the shore and the bells. The speaker has a hard time coming to the realization that the captain has actually died.

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  2. The speaker (in this case, perhaps Whitman himself) greatly admires the captain and is mourning his death. The poem starts out in a happy mood as the speaker describes that the fearful trip is done, but in the third stanza, the speaker accepts that the captain is dead and gone, using vivid imagery. He even calls the captain "my" captain and "dear father", giving us a stronger sense of admiration and connection between them. The speaker wants the captain to wake up again, he wants him to see what he was able to accomplish -- but Lincoln (the Captain) was assassinated. Whitman lost a leader that he looked up to.

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  3. The speaker is quite fond of the captain. The captain was able to save the ship from the fearful trip and was able to prevail as a leader. Obviously the captain is Abraham Lincoln and Whitman is fond of the fact that he saved the U.S from the horrors of slavery. Evidence to support this would be simply how he calls him "Caption, MY captain". He wouldn't call him his own captain if he didn't support his decisions.

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  5. The speaker idolizes the captain, as shown first by the way he addresses the captain as his (my captain) and also at the way he describes how the people, too, love him (the people all exulting… for you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning). Later, he also refers to the captain as his "dear father" and walks the spot where he fell, mourning (I, with mournful tread, walk the deck my captain lies, fallen cold and dead). Throughout this, he capitalizes the word every time he mentions his Captain, showing him respect.

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  6. The speaker admires the Captain greatly for his bravery and humbleness. In the second stanza he reminds the captain to "rise up and hear the bells;" as if the Captain was too modest or humble to acknowledge his accomplishments and take credit for the win in the war.

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  7. I think that the speaker really respects and admires the "Captain" and others around Captain also respected him as well. " I hear, the people all exulting" shows that people other than the speaker was looking up to him.

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  8. The Speaker refers to the "captain" as his father in this line, "My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will" but more literally this could mean mentor, or hero because Whitman did look up to Lincoln and as a hero you would look up to someone.

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  9. The speaker admires the Captain, just like how Witman admired Abraham Lincoln. Witman writes, "My Captain" and "dear father" frequently, which is similar to how people refer to God.

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  10. The speaker admires Captain, which is the same as Whitman's admiration towards Abraham Lincoln. "My captain" and "dear father" shows this, and that all he looks towards is the captain. "My" pretty much shows that he is thinking they have a close relationship.

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  11. The speaker admires the Captain as he refers to him as "my" Captain and "Father". Also by the fact of how shocked and terrified when the Captain dies.

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  12. The speaker admires the Captain because the speaker shouts "Exult O shores and ring O bells", which signifies how powerful and how greatly affected the speaker before the captain's death.

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  13. The speaker admires the Captain. This is evident when he explains in stanza 2, the flag is flung for him, the bugle trills for him, everything is done for the Captain because he was such a brave, heroic leader during the Civil War. The speaker walks with a 'mournful tread' on deck, clearly he is sad about the Captain's death.

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  14. Emma Takahashi

    The speaker looks up to the captain and sees him as a role model. He even says, "Here Captain! dear father!" and refers to him as a good male character like his dad. He also was very down and experienced his blues when he heard that the captain died. He has a very open heart and cares alot about the captain.

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  15. The Speaker personally admires and praises the captain and his accomplishments, as he refers to him as "my captain" and "dear father". This poem emphasizes the captain's great accomplishment and leadership during the Civil War. He recognizes the captain's modesty towards his great leadership and victory in the Civil War as he says, "Rise up—for you the flag is flung—for you the bugle trills"

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  16. The speaker admires the captain because he refers to him as "father" several times. Walt Whitman was supporting the rights of the slaves during the Civil War and Abraham Lincoln was a strong leader that Whitman too supported. His captain was his leader and his role model and he felt lost without him,

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  17. This speaker adulates the captain and extols the achievements of the crew before realizing that his father is dead. Because the speaker is very fond of the captain (his father), he is initially in denial, as he begs the man to arise and celebrate with the rest of them. When he finally accepts his father's death, he mourns, in spite of the heartened celebration all around. The repetition of "Oh Captain, My Captain" signifies his admiration of the man and his perplexity and devastation of the situation.

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  18. The speaker obviously shows an attachment to the captain, as he noted that while everyone else was singing and parading around with glee, he was in a somber mood. He (the speaker) also noted that the captain was like his father, with plenty of repetition for greater impact.

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  19. The speaker obviously respects the captain. As the captain is dying the speaker is denying it. O Captain My Captain rise up and hear the bells. Trying to let the captain know he can't die yet. It is also obvious that the captain was someone close because the speaker mourns at the end when the captain dies.

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  20. The author shows that he knows the captain and is attached to him, he even refers to the captain as a father. The last stanza in particular kind of gave you this feeling that the speaker knew the guy and felt awful that he had died. I think that until then though the speaker was reluctant to accept the captain's death and was praising his achievements.

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  21. The speaker admires the captain, and thinks of him almost as a fatherly figure by mentioning, "Here Captain! dear father!". The speaker emphasis how proud he is to have this person be his captain by repeating "My Captain!". After the Captain's death, the mood of the poem becomes less celebratory. This sudden change signifies how devastated the speaker felt.

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  22. The speaker is very much attached to the Captain as the way he discusses his death creates a sense that he is filled with emotion and sadness. He refers to the captain as his father, meaning that he is of great importance and may be seen to him as a large role in his life. It may also mean he is the leader and father of the ship.

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  23. The speaker in this poem venerates the "captain" and sees him as the prime figure who symbolizes his views (on the Civil War). In the poem, Whitman writes "My father does not feel my arm", showing that Whitman sees his Captain as a leading figure, and the overall joyful tone of the poem (in the first couple of lines in the poem), show the speaker;s attachment to his captain.

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  24. the speaker is obviously very attached to the captain as he is distraught that he has died. To me the speaker must have been someone very close to him, and who supported his thoughts and ideas. Maybe it has some connection to the civil war.

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  25. The speaker is very fond of the captain (his father), as shown by the utter devastation that overcomes him when he sees the captain dead. His initial denial, whereupon the speaker begs his father to receive the recognition he deserves by rising up, alive, shows his refusal to believe of the captain's passing ("It is some dream that... You've fallen cold and dead"). In the third stanza, when the speaker has finally admitted that the captain is deceased, he feels that he can't celebrate with everyone else; all he can do is mourn.

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  26. He is very attached and seems quite passionate about the captain. If walt whitman wrote a poem about Lincoln, then he must have meant a lot to him. "Father" implies that he was of great importance to whitman. He seems almost like a role model for whitman.

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  27. Whitman looks up to the captain (Ab Lincoln) with sincere affection. He is not only a father of the nation but almost a father figure of wisdom to Whitman. In the second stanza walt tells the captain to "rise up and hear the bells." this his a perspective telling Ab to accept and rejoice in his greatness, more specifically his contribution to abolishing slavery.

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  28. The speaker seems attached to the captain. Using words such as "my" and "father" shows that the speaker not only admired the Captain like he would a father, but also was very affectionate of him as well. The speaker then seems as if he tries to check for vital signs and wake the captain. The captain remains dead, and because of this, the speaker uses the word "mournful". This also shows affection.

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  29. Whitman refers to Lincoln as a father, not only because he was the father of his nation, but also because he was a role model to Whitman. Whitman did not want to believe that the person he looked up to the most was dead and says, "My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still;/My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will". In the second stanza, we can see the speaker's desperation in trying to get the captain to wake up, where he repetitively says "For you the flag is flung, For you..."

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  30. The speaker admires Captain, which is the same as Whitman's admiration towards Abraham Lincoln. "I hear, the people all exulting" shows that people other than the speaker was looking up to him. Evidence to support this would be simply how he calls him "Caption, MY captain". He wouldn't call him his own captain if he didn't support his decisions.

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  31. The speaker feels very strongly towards the captain, setting him as one of his role models. We even see the speaker refer to the captain as "father". Fatherly figures are usually associated with hero's and role models.

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  32. The use of 'my' creates a kind of possessive allegiance and respect toward the captain, and to an extent a peaceful submission of status. This is shown further with him referring to the captain as his 'father'. For that matter, him using the word captain at all shows respect for the figure he is referring to. He also had a connection to this person in some way, as he seems to genuinely feel saddened by the person's death.

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  33. The speaker admires the Captain(Abraham Lincoln). He often writes, "My Captain" and "dear father" , which shows that he is thinking of him as a dear father and looking at the entire poem this cannot be irony therefore Whitman admires the captain.

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  34. Whitman thinks of Abraham Lincoln as a father figure and he respects him. In the poem his calls him "dear father" and "my captain" showing that he is an important man in his life.

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  35. Whitman respected Abraham Lincoln who helped create a society where all men were equal. Abraham Lincoln led the Union to fight against the Confederacy who disagreed with many of Lincolns new ideas. The only president in American history to stand up to his own ideals and start a civil war in order to create a free America. At the expense of many American lives including his own, Lincoln accomplished his goal of an equal America and gained respect from Walt Whitman

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  36. Walt Whitman was very fond of the late President Lincoln. He refers to Lincoln as his captain, a leading, inspirational figure in his life. Lincoln, the leader of the union, was very much that kind of figure for the non-secessionist United States during the American Civil War. In being the face of a nation trying to unity in spite of organized violence within its own people, he was very inspirational and heroic in the eyes of those who supported the Union as opposed to the Confederacy.

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  37. Walt Whitman, the "speaker" of this poem admires Abraham Lincoln. The way he refers to him as "my captain" and "dear father" shows his affection and admiration towards him. At the end of the poem, the speaker shows that he is "mournful" when he cannot wake up his dead "father", showing that he feels onnected to him.

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  38. Walt Whitman refers him as captain and a father. soldiers obey their captains and children follow their parents. I can know that Walt Whitman respected and admired Lincoln and had identical notion with him. I can also know that he was strong objector of slavery.

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  39. The speaker really looks up to, and admires the captain who is Abraham Lincoln. Phrases such as "dear father" and "my captain" shows how he respects him, and also has a certain feeling like he is his own.

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  40. Walt Whitman looks up to and idolizes Abraham Lincoln. In line 17, Whitman calls out "My Captain," and in line 18, he refers to the Captain as "My father". He admired Lincoln immensely because of his political standpoint of universal equality as stated in the constitution. The repetition of heart in line five calls attention to Whitman's grief and heartache because the Captain has bled and lies still, cold, and dead (lines 6-8). This is referencing the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and Whitman's sorrow for the death of his idol.

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  41. The speaker looks at the captain, Abraham Lincoln, as a father figure that he respects very much. Whitman shows that he looks Abraham Lincoln as a father figure in Line 13 when he says "Dear father" and Line 18 when he says "My father. Whitman shows that he respects Abraham Lincoln by simply calling him captain throughout the poem, which shows that Whitman takes Abraham Lincoln's authority seriously and supports his authority.

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