Monday, March 18, 2013

Life and Death

Whitman often talks about life and death in his poetry.  How does he bring these two entities together in this poem?

38 comments:

  1. The death of the captain is rather startling compared to the victorious celebrations (life), but nevertheless, the two are brought together in this one event (the end of the journey). He places the lines about life in the first four lines of the first two stanzas, while the lines about death go in the latter half, and are generally much shorter (and have a different rhyme scheme). He juxtaposes life and death by having the speaker mourn the loss of his captain, while all around him life abounds, celebrating their victory.

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  2. Whitman does this by celebrating the life Lincoln lived and showing how much he was loved by the people of the US, while at the same time mourning his loss.

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  3. "Fallen cold and dead" is a common term used repeatedly in the poem when he talks about the death of the captain. When he talks about death opposed to life he talks shorter and cryptic, giving death a saddening feeling and giving life light.

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  4. This poem has two contrasting images- the victory of the war, but also the death of the leader who led the war. He uses different rhythms to show the differences between these two images. It shows that as Whitman mourns Lincoln's death, life around him still continues, because people are celebrating their victories.

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  5. Whitman juxtaposes Life and Death to bring out each one by speaking about Abraham's remarkable accomplishments with his unprecedented death.

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  6. The way Whitman ties life and death together is by celebrating the LIFE of a man by telling the great things he has done, while also telling you again and again that he is dead and what a shame it is.

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  7. Whitman combines life and death together by listing what the captain did and what he will be remembered. Then Whitman talks about how ashamed the captain's death over and over again.

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  8. Whitman mentions life and death in the same poem, which can be an example of juxtaposition, which shows us the idea of happiness and sadness that can occur throughout our. The idea of Abraham Lincoln dying, and the victory of war and the happiness of living, forces us to think that death is just as important as life. He celebrates Lincoln's death as well to show that their is importance of death.

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  9. Witman juxtaposes about the Captain, or Abraham Lincoln's glorious life, as well as his tragic death, which gave an element of happiness and sadness to the poem. Although he talks about the captain's death, it continues to stay light toned. I think Witman is trying to process's Lincoln's murder through his poem.

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  10. Whitman ties the life and death of the captain, metaphorically, Abraham Lincoln by talking about Lincoln's accomplishments and how we should remember his life and his tragic death.

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  11. Like his other poems we studied, Whitman seems to be optimistic about the Captain's death in this poem. He expresses sadness in some lines, however, he describes the great qualities of the Captain and the success in war should be celebrated for him.

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  12. Emma Takahashi

    Whitman connects two very different topics which are life and death by using literary terms like metaphors. He appreciates the life of Lincoln and praises the fact that many people in the U.S. loved him and his great accomplishments.

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  13. He unites his ideas about life and death by acknowledging the life of Lincoln in his poem. In the beginning he uses happy sounds and rhymes to show that Lincoln's life should be celebrated but switched to more solemn rhymes towards the end to mourn the loss of a great leader or "captain".

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  14. The contrast and connection between life and death are represented as Whitman uses different rhyme schemes and writing styles. He expresses joy and happiness in some lines, and sadness and darkness in the other. The juxtaposition between Lincoln's victorious life and his tragic life represent the relationship between life and death.

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  15. The lives of many on the ship were saved, but at the cost of the captain's life. He emphasizes the success and the victory, but he also emphasizes the costs that were extracted to attain that victory. In this way, it seems that he wanted to celebrate both the successes, and remember the losses.

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  16. Whitman uses both rhyme and repetition to connect and contrast between life and death. Whitman uses bells as joy (life) and then uses sadness and darkness by describing what the condition the captain is in (death). This poem was a comparison between Lincoln's great achievements and the sad death he had.

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  17. Life and death are represented in this poem as Lincoln dying to save the lives of the people on the ship. Whitman also uses the tools of rhyme and repetition to make the beginning of the poem lighter to illustrate the lives that were saved and at the end of the poem the beat is slower and has a slanted rhyme to show the death of the captain and how he was very sad about it.

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  18. Through a juxtaposition, Whitman contrasts the vivid optimism of exultation and life with the cold, sorrowful death of one man. These two worlds, one of life and happiness and the other of death and sorrow, are side-by-side, but very clearly different. Though the speaker is initially caught up in the excitement of the voyage's success, the sight of his father is enough to bring his spirits down to dark despair, even as the festivities rage around him.

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  19. Whitman represents both life and death in this poem because although the storyline is largely about death, there is a brightness and vividness to it. This brightness is created through the rhythm, as well as lines which seem to recall triumph. For example, after he first says that the captain is dead, the next lines read, "rise up and hear the bells; Rise up--for you the flag is flung--for you the bugle trills". This line seems to be a celebration of victory and life.

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  20. Whitman brings together life and death in this poem to symbolize how important and significant the work that Lincoln did was while he was alive and the loss it was for the US when he was assassinated at such a victorious moment.

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  21. Whitman brings the two together to show us the reader how substantial the loss of the captain was. And while the ship is safe for now, it might not always be and life could be lost.

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  22. Because the captain died, he shows the death by repeating phrases such as "fallen cold and dead". He seems to mourn the death of his president while showing how much people loved him at the same time. He seems to be celebrating the life that he lived. He uses juxtaposition to portray both at once.

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  23. Whitman incorporates life and death in his poem by emphasizing the victory from saving lives (winning the war), yet he also includes the loss of the leader of this exhibition. This symbolizes how it is important to commemorate ones who were lost in this war since they have saved life and integrity in the US.

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  24. Witman relates life and death using the change of rhyming tone and mood. As indicated by parts like 'done and won' transitioning to 'dead and head.' By juxtaposing these two images together, a connection between honor and death is created. In my opinion, he is noting how Lincoln is honorable even in his death, however sad.

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  25. In this poem, Whitman celebrates a life, but also mourns a death. He celebrates the journey and shows all the people rejoicing their "trip". However Whitman then goes on to mourn the death of the captain. He transitions from life to death from the beginning to end of the poem.

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  26. Whitman juxtaposes images of life and death by writing about life in the first half of each stanza, and about death in the second half. Whitman's juxtaposition of life and death in each stanza gives us a stark difference between them. Although Whitman talks about a sad death, the poem has a bright tone overall, due to the rhythm and the celebration of victory on the ship. This celebration of victory brings life and death together, since it can also be viewed as a celebration for the captain's life and his accomplishments.

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  27. Because the captain died, he shows the death by repeating phrases such as "fallen cold and dead".These two worlds, one of life and happiness and the other of death and sorrow, are side-by-side, but very clearly different. He transitions from life to death from the beginning to end of the poem.

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  28. In this poem, as well as many of his other poems, Whitman relates and compares life and death by using a series of metaphors or extended metaphors. Whitman appreciates and celebrates Lincoln's contribution to the U.S.

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  29. I think it was a kind of ode to a man he greatly respected, in the wake of his death; which in itself ties the two together.

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  30. In this poem the death was represented by the death of Abraham Lincoln where the life is represented by the celebration that was brought by him. Whitman believes in reincarnation and this could be one example of it. As Lincoln dies, another life begins.

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  31. Whitman celebrates the life of Lincoln and all that he accomplished but at the same time mourns over the loss of a great leader.

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  32. Whitman believed in antislavery and supported the union during the civil war. Abraham Lincoln was the president and symbol of a new and truly free America. Toward the end of the brutal civil war Lincoln was assassinated by Booth and thus ended the life of a truly great leader. Whitman in his poem celebrates Lincoln as a great leader but also mourns his death since he wasn't able to carry out the last steps of the war.

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  33. Although Whitman wrote of the brighter side of death in his other poems, in "O Captain, My Captain", he addressed the darker, more depressing side of it. The early end of Abraham Lincoln's life was most definitely sad, for the United States lost a leader that had been unifying them through what was arguably the country's toughest challenge yet: the Civil War between the Union and secessionist Confederate states. In "O Captain, My Captain", Whitman expressed his sadness that stemmed from the death of his president.

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  34. This poem seemed to focus on a different, darker theme than he emphasized in the ones that we read in class including "Song of Myself" and "O me! O life!" Instead, this once seemed to express his depressing ideas on death. His emotions show through the poem, and his admiration towards Abraham Lincoln can be thoroughly seen after he had passed.

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  35. Whitman talks about life and death in this poetry. He shows his admiration to Abraham Lincoln and greatness of him. He also shows sadness for the loss of ‘captain' and by using metaphors and rhymes he makes the poem both joyfulness and sadness.

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  36. I feel like there is both a sense of celebration and mourning in this poem. He shows how he admires Abraham Lincoln, which represents the life side of it, but also shows the sad part when the Captain dies which shows the death. Personally, I feel this poem is a lot more focused compared to his other ones, where I feel it is not very straightforward.

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  37. He brings the entities of 'life' and 'death' together in this poem through the variation in his rhyming patterns and word choices. The first few lines create a happy mood with liveliness, but when the captain dies, the poem becomes rather depressing. The poem celebrates the great accomplishments of Lincoln but mourns his unexpected and terrible death.

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  38. Whitman brings together life and death in this poem by showing his admiration of Abraham Lincoln's accomplishments as a leader and then he shows his grief following the death of Abraham Lincoln. He does this through the rhyming pattern shown in the poem, from the poem being celebratory at the beginning because of the end of the civil war and then being sad at the loss of the captain.

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