Monday, March 18, 2013

Rhyme

This poem has a rhyme scheme (pattern).  What do you notice about this pattern.  Why do you think Whitman chose to include rhyme in this poem?  (Often the form of a poem enhances the meaning).

39 comments:

  1. The rhyme scheme of this pattern is aabb xcxc. The rhyming switches from normal to slant throughout the poem. I notice that at the beginning the rhyming seems very happy, and you do not expect the captain to be dead. But after you find that out, the rhyming seems sort of sad and subdued. Whitman wanted to celebrate the live Lincoln lived, but at the same time mourn his loss. Whitman usually doesn't include rhyme in his poems, but I think here he did because it helps with making the mood in the poem happy then sad and switch.

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  2. Couplet, couplet, random, aba is the rhyme scheme. I think he chose to write this way in order to give the poem a fairly random feel but at the same time he kept it organised so the poem didn't spiral out of control.

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  3. There is some rhyme in the form of aabb xcxc (where x does not rhyme with any other lines), but many times, the rhyming tends to be slightly off (i.e. exulting, daring; bells, trills; crowding, turning). Generally, the lines about celebration are written with less care to perfect rhymes, whereas the lines bout his captain and their journey adhere more to standard rhyming. Whitman probably uses rhyme to establish some form of rhythm, and also to show that while the event is joyous (rhyming poems tend to be less somber than non-rhyming), there are a few things marring the celebration (the deaths, expressed in the form of odd rhymes and shorter lines).

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  4. The rhyme scheme in each stanza can be described as aabb xyzy. The first four lines are rhyming couplets, and then every other line rhymes in the second section. The opening couplets establish a happy mood, but the shorter part in the end brings out the disappointment experienced by the poet over the captain's death.However, the "bells" and "trills" don't rhyme- however, they are consonants.
    Stanza 1 begins with two happy couplets, Stanza 2 begins with two celebrating couplets, Stanza 3 has sad and mourning couplets as the speaker accepts and describes the death of the captain.

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  5. Couplet, Couplet, random, a, b, a. I think Whitman chose to include a rhyming scheme in this poem because it makes a poem much more light-hearted. For instance, music with a heavy and steady beat can often have a positive effect on the reader.

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  6. I think the rhyming scheme is being used to bring out a joyful emotion from the reader, not because of the death, but more to represent the great life of a highly respected man.

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  7. The rhyme scene is aabb xyzy. The verse sections are rhymed couplets. He probably included this, because it is easy to understand when there is a rhythm, and can give a more positive tone.

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  8. The rhyming pattern in this poem is AABBCDED. The first 4 lines are rhyming couplets where last word of the lines. The rhymes help the readers understand the concept because it organizes the poem it self and connects ideas.

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  9. the rhyme scheme is aabb xcxc. I think he chose this ryhme scheme because he wants to tell the reader how respectful and honorable about Lincoln

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  10. The rhyme scheme in the poem was couplet, couplet, random, aba. This gave a very light tone to the poem, having a rhythm making it smooth to read.

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  11. The rhyme scheme of this poem is couplet couplet random aba. The use of couplets at the beginning of the poem illustrates a rhythmic and light tone. The second half of the poem establishes a sad mood. The use of rhyme scheme helps develop the mood and tone of the poem.

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  12. the rhyme scene brings out a slight rhythm to the poem. While spoken with anguish, the rhyme brings out a sense of pride and joy in the poem. It 'lightens up' the poem.

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  13. Emma Takahashi

    The rhyme scheme of this certain poem is a couplet couplet random aba. Using these techniques will usually help to set a certain tone, which is very light and easy. This also helped me to understand the poem better, making it very simple.

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  14. The rhyme scheme in this poem is couplet, couplet, random, aba. I think that he chose this rhyme scheme to make the reader focus on Lincoln and his great accomplishments. The light tone of the words at the beginning and the sad/dark tone towards the end brings out two different aspects and contrasts to Lincoln's life.

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  15. Walt Whitman usually doesn't rhyme in his poems but in this piece he used rhymes that went from perfect to slant. He wanted to acknowledge the life that lincoln lived but also wanted to mourn his death so in the beginning he uses a light perfect rhyme scheme but changes to a more slow beat and uses slant rhymes.

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  16. At first, the joyous tones are rhymed to create a light and airy feel as if a great thing had been accomplished, and the rhyme was to make it stand out. Toward the end, the death, the somber tones, the sorrow were rhymed to show the reader the influence the death of the captain held over the speaker.

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  17. Whitman used different types of rhymes in this poems, starting with perfect rhyme and ending with a slanted rhyme. This makes it so that the beginning of the poem seems light, airy, and happier (proud of his captain) whereas the end of the poem is darker and slower (when he realizes that his captain is dead).

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  18. Whitman uses rhymes and couplets to bring out the expression of joy. As the poem goes on Whitman changes his technique to rhyme scheme to mark sadness and sorrow.

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  19. In this poem, Whitman used the rhyme scheme of couplet, couplet, random, aba. These various types of rhymes follow with the mood of the poem, where he starts out happy and ends in sorrow. In order to make the poem be more energetic and joyous to celebrate the Captain, adding a rhyme helped establish an energetic rhythm to the poem.

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  20. I think that Whitman included a rhyme scheme in the poem to bring a lightness to a story of a captain's death. Whitman often emphasized death as a positive thing in his poems, and the rhythmic-ness of this poem was his way of doing so.

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  21. aabb xcxc is the rhyming pattern. The beginning of the poem starts out very cheerful and clearly rhyming, but as the reader learns that the captain has died the rhymes become imperfect. I think that this writing technique is used to create the mood for when the captain has died, that there is a lot of sadness with it.

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  22. The rhymes Whitman uses in this poem are both simple and slanted– a slanted rhyme marks an idea transitioning ("the vessel grim and daring", "their eager faces turning") whereas the repetition of the very clear "fallen cold and dead" line always marks the end of a stanza.

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  23. Whitman who might be the speaker uses rhyme schemes which is unusual as he doesnt usually. whitman however does use one of his recurring motifs which is death and it is supposed to be positive i assume but its seems very sad.

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  24. Whitman uses a rhyme scheme to emphasize the tone and mood of this poem. Rhyming poems are often associated with a sense of joy and youth, but the tone of the poem turns somber near the end of the poem as the rhyming pattern turns imperfect.

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  25. The repetition of "fallen cold and dead" made it easy to see how bad he felt about Lincoln's death. The rhyme scheme is called "aabb xcxc" where the x's do not rhyme. He used this rhyme scheme to express the sadness he felt over president Abraham Lincoln's death. Some of the rhyming in this poem does not match up completely.

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  26. The rhyme scheme is aabb xcxc. This imperfect poetry creates an excellent balance to allow much more sentence structure for Whitman, but still forming a nicely flowing poem. As the poem progress Whitman changes to tone created by rhyme from respect, and honor to dark and sad.

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  27. The rhyme scheme is a couplet couplet random aba. I think Whitman does this to bring out a joyful undertone of sorts. The rhythm helps keep the poem upbeat. This however, masks the sadness that the speaker feels. All the exclamation points do the same thing as well. The fact that the captain is dead doesn't dawn on the speaker until third stanza.

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  28. The first half of the first and third stanza consists of a couplet scheme, AABB. The first half of the second stanza has some rhyme in couplets, such as bells, trills, crowding, turning. The second part of each stanza follows an ABCB rhyme scheme. This rhyme scheme gives keeps the poem upbeat at first, but we can see it varies from a medium pace to a slower pace (by stanza) as the poem progresses. The rhythm slows down as the speaker's sadness increases.

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  29. I think that Whitman included a rhyme scheme in the poem to bring a lightness to a story of a captain's death. The rhythm helps keep the poem upbeat. This however, masks the sadness that the speaker feels. In order to make the poem be more energetic and joyous to celebrate the Captain, adding a rhyme helped establish an energetic rhythm to the poem.

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  30. Rhyme scheme is used in this poem to emphasize the tone or mood of the poem. The use of rhymes is usually linked with building a rather bright mood, but as this poem progresses, you see the rhymes become imperfect.

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  31. It started with two rhyming couplets, followed by a simple four-line.

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  32. The rhyme scheme is: AABCDEFE, GGHIJEKE, LLMNOEPE. I noticed that the rhythm varies from a medium pace to a slower pace and the rhythm slows down when the poem gets sadder although the rhythm is consistent throughout each stanza. This slow down of rhythm was lead by imperfect rhymes which were used later on in the poem build this sorrowful feeling.

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  33. He used the rhyme scheme couplet, couplet, ABA and random. He uses this technique to emphasize meaning and keep the reader interested.

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  34. The rhyme scheme of the poem is AABB XCXC. The first four lines of each stanza, which use rhyming couplets, are very upbeat; the last four lines of each stanza show a contrast in that they are gloomy and address the death of the "captain", Abraham Lincoln.

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  35. As everybody else said, the rhyme scheme is aabb xcxc, with x being non-rhyming endings. The rhymes seem to appear more in the times he is talking about his captain, rather than the celebrations.

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  36. The Rhyme scheme forms joyful atmosphere when the poem is celebrating about Abraham Lincoln. At the same time Rhyme enhances the grief of Lincoln's death. He used couplet. I can notice that there are many similar sentence structures.

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  37. The rhyme scheme is aabb xcxc. I think Whitman wrote it in this way, because to me this gives a celebratory feel as well as a sad feel - as in, the mood is not one extreme.

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  38. The rhyme scheme of this poem is aabb xcxc. The opening couplets of the first two stanzas establish a happy mood, with the off rhyming of "bells" and "trills" to emphasize celebration. The shortened succeeding lines brings out the disappointment experienced by the poet over the captain's death. Stanza 3 re-establishes the rhyming couplet pattern, but it is clear that the mood is different now that the captain is dead.

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  39. The rhyme scheme of this poem is aabb xcxc. The rhyming in the poem starts off happy as we learn that the fearful trip (referring to the civil war) is over. However, after finding out that the captain (referring to Abraham Lincoln) has died the rhyming becomes sad.

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